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Sir Michael Marmot on social determinants of health: Blending evidence and passion

Posted by Ted Schrecker
Ted Schrecker
Ted Schrecker is a clinical scientist at the Élisabeth Bruyère Research Institut
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, 20 February 2013
in CHNET-Works!

On an unseasonably warm day in May 2012, Sir Michael Marmot came to Canada for a short visit with the Public Health Agency of Canada and the University of Ottawa, supported by the CIHR Institute of Population and Public Health. His presentation at the University of Ottawa, from which we present video excerpts here, is simultaneously a succinct and a passionate defence of the social determinants of health agenda and its ethical foundations.

Sir Michael is introduced by the Hon. Monique Bégin, a former Canadian Minister of Health and Welfare and a member of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health. She comments that: "Canada ... is so wealthy, despite the scary global economic times, that it manages to mask the reality of poverty, social exclusion, discrimination, employment erosion, mental health, and youth suicides. While one of the world's biggest spenders on health care, we have one of the worst records when it comes to providing an effective social safety net."

The first part of Sir Michael's presentation offers a bit of anecdotal history about the internal processes of the commission. He then makes two main points. First, he is hopeful that the Commission's report may be one of a few international commission reports, like that of the Brundtland Commission on sustainable development (1987) that have a real impact. At least, he says, officials like Commonwealth ministers are talking the language of social determinants of health. Second, he distinguishes the economic case for acting on social determinants of health from the moral case, based on social justice. In words that echo the long-ago wisdom of Anatole France, he concludes that: "The freedom to wallow in poverty," or to be unemployed, "is not a freedom that is much prized."

In the next part of his presentation, Sir Michael emphasizes the importance of the Commission's focus on inequalities of power, money and resources. He goes on to describe history of the British strategic review on health equity, which he also chaired, and its organization around a lifecourse framework; his efforts to advance interest in social determinants of health as president of the British Medical Association; and how initial cynicism was transformed into enthusiastic takeup of his message about the importance of social determinants of women's health among British obstetricians and gynecologists.

Finally, Sir Michael argues that social protection policy matters for health. "The greater the social spending, the lower the all-cause mortality, for 18 EU countries." And he explains a remarkable initiative by the Merseyside Fire & Rescue Service (that's Liverpool, for readers too young to remember where the Beatles came from) to address social determinants of health by helping people apply for grants to improve their housing, quit smoking and increase their levels of physical activity using the gymnasia at fire stations. He ends with the observation that "We are involved in an intensely ethical concern. We are trying to get a more just society."

 

What can we in Canada learn from this presentation? That could be a long disquisition, but the short version is: blending evidence and passion matters, and we have too few leaders in population health and health social science who are capable of doing so.

Acknowledgements: Many thanks to CIHR's Institute of Population and Public Health for offering these video files.

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Good news and bad on health equity

Posted by Ted Schrecker
Ted Schrecker
Ted Schrecker is a clinical scientist at the Élisabeth Bruyère Research Institut
User is currently offline
on Friday, 06 July 2012
in CHNET-Works!

Herewith a selection of events from around the web, and the world. First, some good news. The Caledon Institute for Social Policy, a non-profit with a long history of progressive social policy analysis that is now headed by two accomplished alumni of the recently deceased National Council of Welfare, has announced that it will take over preparing and publishing two of the Council's most important data series: those on welfare incomes and the profile of poverty in Canada. These are core resources, and Caledon is to be congratulated on this initiative, which will be part of a new Canada Social Report. I hope that one or more Canadian academic institutions will offer to support them, financially and with other resources.

My current institutional home, the Bruyère Research Institute, has produced a valuable set of tips for keeping seniors safe in the heat. As I write we're at humidex 34 here in Ottawa, so the importance of such advice can't be overestimated. Eric Klinenberg's remarkable "social autopsy" of the 1995 Chicago heat wave reminds us that a clear socioeconomic gradient exists with respect to opportunities to stay safe in the heat. Many people can't afford air conditioning or a breezy cottage, and in Chicago the elderly on moderate incomes in particular found themselves isolated by fear of crime and other elements of the urban environment from locations that could at least have kept them cool.

In a world that may experience extreme heat and weather events with greater frequency as a result of human-induced climate change, such warnings assume special importance. They may also not be enough. On June 30, it was reported that a combination of violent storms and extreme heat had caused the deaths of at least 12 people in the United States, and millions more were "facing temperatures in the 40s without electricity, and without air conditioning." Record temperatures and wildfires in Colorado had forced the evacuation of 32,000 people and the cancellation of the iconic Pikes Peak Hill Climb, a motor sports event with almost religious significance for aging gearheads like yours truly. But not to worry, say the climate change sceptics; the evidence is insufficient and these may be natural variations from the mean. Everything will be fine.

Finally, a shift to the global frame of reference. A little-noticed resolution adopted in May by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization, called on the "international community" to support action on social determinants of health and, more concretely, on WHO's Director-General "to duly consider social determinants of health" and to continue advocacy for their importance within the UN System. Supporting documentation pointed out that implementing the resolution would require an additional $33.6 million between 2012 and 2017, and that the cash-strapped WHO had no resources in its current core budget for these activities. To put the amount into context, it's equivalent to the cost of 22 of the 588 Tomahawk cruise missiles the US Department of Defense planned to buy between 2010 and 2012 ... and Tomahawk was just a drop in the United States' $1.5 trillion arms procurement budget over those years. What was it that the Commission on Social Determinants of Health had to say about "a toxic combination of poor social policies and programmes, unfair economic arrangements, and bad politics"?

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